Saturday, May 17, 2014

Oswald Helped Thwart Plot Vs. JFK in Chicago

This is from Sherwood Ross:


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Far from assassinating President Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald was a loyal American who warned the FBI in writing in Oct., 1963, that there was a plot afoot to shoot JFK if he came to Chicago, a new book asserts. 

Oswald's timely warning caused the Chicago plot to fizzle, writes lawyer Navy Lt. Cmdr. James D. Norvell, J.D., late of Ft. Worth, Tex., in his just published book, "Treason, Treachery & Deceit: The Murderers of JFK, MLK & RFK."

Oswald was being "run" by David Atlee Phillips, formerly CIA station chief in Mexico City, and he tried, Norvell says,"to see if he could pass along any useful information about the conspirators to any and all loyal CIA/FBI who were noninvolved with the JFK assassination (planning)efforts. (Page 293)

"Forensic tests proved that Oswald had not fired a rifle or any other shoulder-fired weapon on the day of the JFK assassination," Norvell writes. "There is abundant eyewitness evidence that he was on the second floor at the time of the shootings instead of on one of the upper floors of the Texas State Book Depository(TSBD)."

What's more, Oswald's carbine was a low- not high-velocity, rifle, "and could not have caused the severe damage to Kennedy's head,nor could the slug have survived a trip through the bony structures of JFK's neck, Norvell writes, adding, the other shots were probably fired from high-powered, high-velocity rifles.

Norvell writes that it was the CIA's Atlee Philips who got Oswald to take the TSBD job a few weeks before JFK's murder. The job was designed "to give the conspicuous, dissident, lone-nut Oswald a means to get at JFK from a tall building near a potential parade route so he could be framed conveniently for the assassination later on," Norvell wrote. He points out, further, that Oswald was carrying a U.S. government I.D. card when he was arrested in Dallas.

Kept from the public was the fact Dallas police arrested two Oswalds' after the JFK murder at the Texas Theater and put them in separate police cars. En route to the police station,  the police dispatcher radioed the car with Lee Oswald: "We got the president's murderer, so you need to release the guy you got there." The policemen obediently take the handcuffs of Lee Oswald's wrists and release him. The other Oswald, named Harvey, Oswald's double, is taken to the police station, where he is interrogated and shot the next day by night club owner Jack Ruby. 

At the time of President Kennedy's murder, the uninvolved Oswald was drinking a soda in the TSBD with the depository's superintendent in the employee lunch room. A Dallas police officer enters with pistol drawn and tells Supt. Roy Truly he is looking for the shooter. Truly replies, motioning to Oswald, "He's all right; he works here," and the officer moves on. Oswald decides to go home and walks nonchalantly toward his apartment, then takes two buses and finally a taxi when his bus gets caught in traffic.

In charge of the JFK killing, Norvell writes, was Major General Edward Lansdale, a CIA Black Ops expert, who afterwards paid some shooters as much as $100,000 for their role, the 585-page book says. 

Upon resigning his naval commission after several tours of duty in Viet Nam, Norvell worked as a trial lawyer for 30 years, including as the attorney for LBJ aide Billie Sol Estes. 

Norvell goes on to write that the Soviets learned of the JFK assassination plot and feared they would be blamed as Oswald defected to them in 1959, after which he was "sheep-dipped" by his handlers to assume a pro-Castro image.  #

(This news release prepared by media consultants Sherwood Ross Associates. Reach Sherwood Ross at or write to him in care of Ross Associates, 102 S.W. 6th Avenue, Miami, FL, 33130. Phone: (305) 205-8281)